Sports

 

Media playback is not supported on this device

Euro 2016: Roy Hodgson expecting ‘very difficult game’ for England against Iceland

England manager Roy Hodgson looks certain to recall Raheem Sterling for what he accepts is a “win or bust” match against Iceland in the last 16 at Euro 2016 in Nice on Monday.

The 21-year-old Manchester City winger, who has struggled so far in the tournament, is expected to replace Adam Lallana as Harry Kane and Daniel Sturridge form England’s attacking spearhead.

Sterling was substituted at half-time in the 2-1 win against Wales when England trailed 1-0 and was left out of the goalless draw with Slovakia.

However, Sterling received strong public backing from England assistant boss Ray Lewington and former Liverpool team-mate Sturridge, who told BBC Radio 5 Live that Sterling was “one of the most talented players in the world”.

He is likely to start on the left with Kane through the centre, leaving Sturridge to try and pose a threat from a position on the right.

England’s likely line-up: Hart, Walker, Cahill, Smalling, Rose, Alli, Dier, Rooney, Sterling, Kane, Sturridge.

Hodgson’s deal expires at the end of the tournament and Football Association chairman Greg Dyke has said the 68-year-old will only stay on if England “do well”, suggesting that a quarter-final place was a minimum requirement.

Hosts France, who beat the Republic of Ireland 2-1, will be the quarter-final opponents in Paris next Sunday should England beat underdogs Iceland, who are ranked 34th in the world.

Hodgson is aware of how the knockout phase could impact on his own future, saying: “I think the day you stop concerning yourself, worrying about it, thinking about it, that’s the day when you’ve lost interest in the work.”

The wrong half of the draw?

Media playback is not supported on this device

Euro 2016: Dangerous Iceland have nothing to lose – Gary Cahill

England could only finish second behind Wales in Group B, therefore dropping into the harder half of the Euro 2016 draw alongside France, Germany, Spain and Italy.

Hodgson was criticised after he made six changes to his side and then missed out on the win against Slovakia that would have put them at the head of their section, instead drawing 0-0.

The manager added: “All you can do is force yourself to worry only about the things you can do – to make certain that when you look in the mirror, as the players go out on to the field, you can look at yourself and say ‘What else could I have done?’

“‘Did we prepare well enough? Was the training right? Have I chosen the right team?'”

England’s draw against Slovakia meant a last-16 meeting with Iceland, but placed them in what is widely regarded as the tougher half of the draw if they move deeper into Euro 2016.

Their fans were starting to gather in the south of France on Sunday – and Hodgson knows there is only one outcome that will satisfy the thousands expected to gather inside the Allianz Riviera Stade De Nice, England’s players and, in all likelihood, the FA.

Media playback is not supported on this device

England will excite people – Sturridge

Hodgson demands ruthless streak

England scored only three goals in three group games and Hodgson revealed the squad had been “brutal” on themselves in an attempt to cure a lack of cutting edge.

“I don’t think we can be accused of not having imposed ourselves on the game,” he said. “I don’t even think we can be accused of not creating any goal chances because I think we have.

“We haven’t taken them and as a result we have drawn against Slovakia in a game in which, with that type of domination, should have been a win but we didn’t get it.

“We need to be as ruthless as we can possibly be because we know there are no prizes, unfortunately, for playing what some people might think is good football.

“It’s now all about winning or losing, staying in or going out, and we have been very brutal with ourselves in that respect and we have a very brutal focus.”

A life-changing match for Iceland players

Iceland trained at the Allianz Riviera stadium on Sunday

Joint Iceland coach Heimir Hallgrimsson, 49, had to take time off work for this tournament as he juggles his role with the national team with his job as a part-time dentist.

He will take over from his co-manager Lars Lagerback at the end of this tournament, and he believes he and his players could be in for a life-changing experience if they beat England.

“The players have already won the hearts of all Icelandic people for their performances,” he said.

“If we beat England, their lives will significantly change forever. Icelandic football will go up in reputation and the way we approach football will be different.

“It will all look different for us. If you want the best out of life, you have to be ready when the chance is there for you.

“There aren’t bigger chances than this for Icelandic football. It’s just up to the players to play and hopefully we will beat England. But whichever way this goes, these players are winners already.”

What can England expect from Iceland?

BBC Sport’s Paul Fletcher in Paris

Roy Hodgson should know what to expect when his team play Iceland – after all they have been unchanged for all three of their games in France.

They have averaged 29% possession so far, attempted the lowest number of dribbles in the group stage, made the second-lowest number of successful passes and had the joint second-lowest numbers of shots.

It all hints at Hodgson’s side facing another test against a defensively-orientated side. England’s ability to carve open an opponent faces a significant examination; their supposedly suspect defence will perhaps be under less pressure.

That said, captain Aron Gunnarsson will look to launch balls into the England box with long throws whenever possible – meaning that some test of England’s defending in aerial battles can be expected.

Iceland play a rigid 4-4-2. They are physical and well-organised and have enough craft to slow the game down.

Big, robust and incredibly determined – striker Jon Dadi Bodvarsson tweeted that he was “ready to run until my lungs give out” before their game against Austria and duly scored his first goal in 20 appearances. It is this type of spirit that epitomises his team and which England must overcome in Nice.

Media playback is not supported on this device

Euro 2016: Icelandic commentator goes wild over late winner

A dentist and a Eurovision video director

  • Iceland is the smallest nation to take part at a European Championship or World Cup. With a population of 330,000, it has as many people as Leicester.
  • With no professional clubs in Iceland, all 23 players ply their trade abroad. Former Chelsea and Barcelona forward Eidur Gudjohnsen, now aged 37, is the most notable name, along with British-based players Gylfi Sigurdsson (Swansea), Aron Gunnarsson (Cardiff) and Johann Gudmundsson (Charlton).
  • Penalties. A word which strikes fear into all England fans. But they will be hoping Iceland’s inexperience in these nerve-jangling situations is a positive. Iceland have never taken part in a penalty shootout.
  • Iceland do have one veteran of a European tournament. Sort of. That’s because goalkeeper Hannes Halldorsson directed the video for the country’s 2012 Eurovision entry. Incidentally, neither Iceland or Great Britain gave each other any points in that contest – a 0-0 stalemate if you like.

Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed

 
Lionel Messi made his debut for Argentina in 2005

Argentina and Barcelona forward Lionel Messi retired from international duty after missing in a penalty shootout as Chile won the Copa America final.

“For me the national team is over. I’ve done all I can, it hurts not to be a champion,” the 29-year-old said.

With Barcelona, Messi has won eight La Liga titles and four Champions Leagues.

But his only major international honour is 2008 Olympic gold, with Argentina now having lost three major finals in three years.

Argentina were beaten 1-0 in the 2014 World Cup final by Germany before two Copa America final defeats by Chile on penalties. He was also on the losing side against Brazil in the 2007 Copa America final.

After Sunday’s match finished 0-0 in 120 minutes, Chile won 4-2 on penalties.

Messi’s penalty miss was Argentina’s first attempt in the shootout and it ballooned over the bar after Sergio Romero had denied Chile’s Arturo Vidal.

Lucas Biglia also missed from 12 yards, with Chilean substitute Francisco Silva scoring the decisive spot-kick in the final in East Rutherford, New Jersey.

More to follow.

Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed

 

Media playback is not supported on this device

Euro 2016: Hungary 0-4 Belgium highlights

Eden Hazard scored a dazzling solo goal as Belgium defeated Hungary to book a Euro 2016 last-eight tie against Wales.

The Chelsea winger was outstanding in Toulouse and capped off a good Belgium display when he cut in from the left, beat two players and fired in low.

Tottenham’s Toby Alderweireld headed Belgium ahead and Michu Batshuayi made it 2-0 when he tapped in.

Hazard then scored his superb goal in the 80th minute before Yannick Carrasco fired in the fourth in stoppage time.

Belgium and Wales will meet in Lille on Friday.

Relive the action as it happened in Toulouse

Report: France 2-1 Republic of Ireland

Report: Germany 3-0 Slovakia

The ‘golden generation’ make it count

Kevin De Bruyne had 78 touches of the ball – more than any other player – and also had the most efforts on goal

They underwhelmed at the 2014 World Cup, but the most promising Belgium squad since Guy Thys’ 1980 runners-up suggested they could be set to fulfil their potential on the big stage.

At times, they made hard work of it against the Magyars, but they did create 25 efforts on goal.

Manchester City’s Kevin De Bruyne had seven of those, including a brilliant first-half free-kick that was tipped over by 40-year-old Gabor Kiraly. The 24-year-old also provided two of the four assists.

Both he and Hazard were the most potent weapons, with Everton striker Romelu Lukaku failing to marry willingness with goal threat.

It was Spurs defender Alderweireld who gave the Belgians a 10th-minute lead when he headed in De Bruyne’s free-kick from the left.

After soaking up Hungarian pressure, they finally scored a second when Batshuayi slotted in Hazard’s square ball, only two minutes after coming on.

Hazard made it 3-0 with the goal of the game. Belgium broke from the Hungary area, De Bruyne played a pass to the feet of Hazard who dived in from the left, eased past two challenges before slotting into the keeper’s bottom left.

By this point, Hungary had given up the fight and were handed a knockout blow when Atletico Madrid’s Carrasco, on as a substitute, slammed in from a Radja Nainggolan through ball.

Warning: Hazard in form

Media playback is not supported on this device

Euro 2016: Eden Hazard scores Belgium’s third goal against Hungary

The 2014-15 Premier League footballer of the year was a disappointment last season.

He only managed six goals in 50 appearances for a Chelsea side who went from champions to finishing 10th.

However, towards the end of that campaign he began to show glimpses of the form of the previous season and against Hungary he gave right-back Adam Lang a full workout.

Aside from his goal and assist, he made the joint second-highest number of passes (48) and had three efforts on goal.

Belgium coach Marc Wilmots said: “I told Eden that I wanted to score a goal by cutting inside.

“He wasn’t close enough to the goal and he needs to have fun when he’s out on the pitch. A captain can’t always do his talking with his mouth. Sometimes you have to do your talking with your feet and that’s what he did today.”

BBC analyst Trevor Sinclair added: “It was an absolutely outstanding, world-class performance. He’s the man of the match – that was the performance of the tournament. He has led by example.”

Unlucky Hungary

Coach Bernd Stock’s side can be proud of their efforts in what was Hungary’s first major tournament since the 1986 World Cup finals.

They were a clear second best to Belgium in the first half, but improved markedly after the break and went close through Adam Szalai’s header and centre-back Roland Juhasz’s beautiful angled strike with the outside of his boot.

Had they converted one of those chances, then the outcome might have been very different.

Man of the match – Kevin De Bruyne (Belgium)

Eden Hazard was brilliant but Kevin De Bruyne led the attack from kick off and provided two assists

‘I have to congratulate Belgium’

Belgium coach Marc Wilmots: “We should have been at least 3-0 up at half-time. We kept the game at 1-0 too long.

“We scored the second and third goals very quickly, but we needed a lot of chances. In big games you don’t get as many chances, you get punished.

“I told my players to be patient. Often in training, we do two-touch passing. In Brazil you asked me why and today you see why. You can move the ball very quickly.

“I have to say Kevin De Bruyne, every time he lost the ball he made the effort to come back and that’s what makes the side strong. When we don’t have the ball we don’t allow many chances.”

Hungary boss Bernd Storck: “We knew we were coming up against terrific opposition.

“I have to congratulate the team for their performance throughout the championships. We have a positive view of the future.”

Live Text

Match ends, Hungary 0, Belgium 4.

Second Half ends, Hungary 0, Belgium 4.

Ádám Szalai (Hungary) is shown the yellow card.

Marouane Fellaini (Belgium) is shown the yellow card for a bad foul.

Ádám Szalai (Hungary) wins a free kick in the attacking half.

Foul by Marouane Fellaini (Belgium).

Goal! Hungary 0, Belgium 4. Yannick Carrasco (Belgium) left footed shot from the left side of the box to the bottom left corner. Assisted by Radja Nainggolan with a through ball following a fast break.

Attempt saved. Ákos Elek (Hungary) left footed shot from the centre of the box is saved in the centre of the goal. Assisted by Ádám Szalai.

Michy Batshuayi (Belgium) is shown the yellow card.

Balázs Dzsudzsák (Hungary) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

Foul by Michy Batshuayi (Belgium).

Delay over. They are ready to continue.

Delay in match Axel Witsel (Belgium) because of an injury.

Attempt blocked. Balázs Dzsudzsák (Hungary) left footed shot from outside the box is blocked.

Nemanja Nikolic (Hungary) wins a free kick in the attacking half.

Foul by Thomas Vermaelen (Belgium).

Attempt saved. Michy Batshuayi (Belgium) right footed shot from outside the box is saved in the centre of the goal. Assisted by Axel Witsel.

Ádám Nagy (Hungary) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

Foul by Radja Nainggolan (Belgium).

Attempt saved. Gergö Lovrencsics (Hungary) left footed shot from outside the box is saved in the centre of the goal.

Corner, Hungary. Conceded by Marouane Fellaini.

Attempt saved. Ádám Szalai (Hungary) right footed shot from the centre of the box is saved in the top centre of the goal. Assisted by Richárd Guzmics.

Corner, Hungary. Conceded by Toby Alderweireld.

Attempt blocked. Ákos Elek (Hungary) left footed shot from the left side of the box is blocked. Assisted by Gergö Lovrencsics.

Balázs Dzsudzsák (Hungary) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

Foul by Kevin De Bruyne (Belgium).

Substitution, Belgium. Marouane Fellaini replaces Eden Hazard.

Substitution, Hungary. Dániel Böde replaces Roland Juhász.

Goal! Hungary 0, Belgium 3. Eden Hazard (Belgium) right footed shot from outside the box to the bottom right corner. Assisted by Kevin De Bruyne following a fast break.

Goal! Hungary 0, Belgium 2. Michy Batshuayi (Belgium) right footed shot from very close range to the bottom right corner. Assisted by Eden Hazard following a corner.

Corner, Belgium. Conceded by Tamás Kádár.

Substitution, Belgium. Michy Batshuayi replaces Romelu Lukaku.

Substitution, Hungary. Nemanja Nikolic replaces Ádám Pintér.

Foul by Tamás Kádár (Hungary).

Romelu Lukaku (Belgium) wins a free kick on the right wing.

Substitution, Belgium. Yannick Carrasco replaces Dries Mertens.

Foul by Ákos Elek (Hungary).

Radja Nainggolan (Belgium) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

Ádám Szalai (Hungary) wins a free kick in the attacking half.

Foul by Thomas Vermaelen (Belgium).

Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed

 

Media playback is not supported on this device

Hodgson expects ‘very difficult game’ against Iceland

England v Iceland (Monday, 20:00 BST)

How to follow:
Watch on ITV, listen on BBC Radio 5 live, text commentary on the BBC Sport website.

England manager Roy Hodgson accepts he faces a “win or bust” match when they meet Iceland in the last 16 at Euro 2016 in Nice on Monday.

Hodgson’s deal expires at the end of the tournament and Football Association chairman Greg Dyke has said the 68-year-old will only stay on if England “do well”, suggesting that a quarter-final place was a minimum requirement.

Hosts France, who beat the Republic of Ireland 2-1, will be the quarter-final opponents in Paris next Sunday should England beat underdogs Iceland, who are ranked 34th in the world.

Hodgson is aware of how the knockout phase could impact on his own future, saying: “I think the day you stop concerning yourself, worrying about it, thinking about it, that’s the day when you’ve lost interest in the work.”

England’s likely line-up: Hart, Walker, Cahill, Smalling, Rose, Alli, Dier, Rooney, Sterling/Lallana, Kane, Sturridge.

The wrong half of the draw?

England could only finish second behind Wales in Group B, therefore dropping into the harder half of the Euro 2016 draw alongside France, Germany, Spain and Italy.

Hodgson was criticised after he made six changes to his side and then missed out on the win against Slovakia that would have put them at the head of their section, instead drawing 0-0.

The manager added: “All you can do is force yourself to worry only about the things you can do – to make certain that when you look in the mirror, as the players go out on to the field, you can look at yourself and say ‘What else could I have done?’

“Did we prepare well enough? Was the training right? Have I chosen the right team?'”

England’s draw against Slovakia meant a last-16 meeting with Iceland, but placed them in what is widely regarded as the tougher half of the draw if they move deeper into Euro 2016.

Their fans were starting to gather in the south of France on Sunday – and Hodgson knows there is only one outcome that will satisfy the thousands expected to gather inside the Allianz Riviera Stade De Nice, England’s players and, in all likelihood, the FA.

Media playback is not supported on this device

England will excite people – Sturridge

Hodgson demands ruthless streak

England scored only three goals in three group games and Hodgson revealed the squad had been “brutal” on themselves in an attempt to cure a lack of cutting edge.

“I don’t think we can be accused of not having imposed ourselves on the game,” he said. “I don’t even think we can be accused of not creating any goal chances because I think we have.

“We haven’t taken them and as a result we have drawn against Slovakia in a game in which, with that type of domination, should have been a win but we didn’t get it.

“We need to be as ruthless as we can possibly be because we know there are no prizes, unfortunately, for playing what some people might think is good football.

“It’s now all about winning or losing, staying in or going out, and we have been very brutal with ourselves in that respect and we have a very brutal focus.”

A life-changing match for Iceland players

Iceland trained at the Allianz Riviera stadium on Sunday

Joint Iceland coach Heimir Hallgrimsson, 49, had to take time off work for this tournament as he juggles his role with the national team with his job as a part-time dentist.

He will take over from his co-manager Lars Lagerback at the end of this tournament, and he believes he and his players could be in for a life-changing experience if they beat England.

“The players have already won the hearts of all Icelandic people for their performances,” he said.

“If we beat England, their lives will significantly change forever. Icelandic football will go up in reputation and the way we approach football will be different.

“It will all look different for us. If you want the best out of life, you have to be ready when the chance is there for you.

“There aren’t bigger chances than this for Icelandic football. It’s just up to the players to play and hopefully we will beat England. But whichever way this goes, these players are winners already.”

What can England expect from Iceland?

BBC Sport’s Paul Fletcher in Paris

Roy Hodgson should know what to expect when his team play Iceland – after all they have been unchanged for all three of their games in France.

They have averaged 29% possession so far, attempted the lowest number of dribbles in the group stage, made the second-lowest number of successful passes and had the joint second-lowest numbers of shots.

It all hints at Hodgson’s side facing another test against a defensively-orientated side. England’s ability to carve open an opponent faces a significant examination; their supposedly suspect defence will perhaps be under less pressure.

That said, captain Aron Gunnarsson will look to launch balls into the England box with long throws whenever possible – meaning that some test of England’s defending in aerial battles can be expected.

Iceland play a rigid 4-4-2. They are physical and well-organised and have enough craft to slow the game down.

Big, robust and incredibly determined – striker Jon Dadi Bodvarsson tweeted that he was “ready to run until my lungs give out” before their game against Austria and duly scored his first goal in 20 appearances. It is this type of spirit that epitomises his team and which England must overcome in Nice.

Media playback is not supported on this device

Euro 2016: Icelandic commentator goes wild over late winner

A dentist and a Eurovision video director

  • Iceland is the smallest nation to take part at a European Championship or World Cup. With a population of 330,000, it has as many people as Leicester.
  • With no professional clubs in Iceland, all 23 players ply their trade abroad. Former Chelsea and Barcelona forward Eidur Gudjohnsen, now aged 37, is the most notable name, along with British-based players Gylfi Sigurdsson (Swansea), Aron Gunnarsson (Cardiff) and Johann Gudmundsson (Charlton).
  • Penalties. A word which strikes fear into all England fans. But they will be hoping Iceland’s inexperience in these nerve-jangling situations is a positive. Iceland have never taken part in a penalty shootout.
  • Iceland do have one veteran of a European tournament. Sort of. That’s because goalkeeper Hannes Halldorsson directed the video for the country’s 2012 Eurovision entry. Incidentally, neither Iceland or Great Britain gave each other any points in that contest – a 0-0 stalemate if you like.

Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed

 

Media playback is not supported on this device

Euro 2016: Germany 3-0 Slovakia highlights

Germany enhanced their status as favourites for Euro 2016 as they overwhelmed Slovakia in Lille to set up a quarter-final against Italy or Spain.

Centre-back Jerome Boateng gave the world champions an eighth-minute lead with a superb 25-yard volley before Mario Gomez poked in the second.

Julian Draxler, who provided a superb assist for the second, made it 3-0 with a near-post volley after the break.

Mesut Ozil also missed a penalty for Germany in the 14th minute.

Slovakia’s best chance fell to Juraj Kucka, whose header was brilliantly tipped over by Manuel Neuer.

The last-eight tie between Joachim Low’s side and one of the other fancied teams takes place in Bordeaux next Saturday.

Relive Germany v Slovakia as it happened

Predictably unpredictable

The three-time European champions have set a standard. Their performance in Lille was arguably the most dominant by a team at this championship.

After three average group displays, this was more trademark Low. The 56-year-old is a coach who does not believe in rigid roles, and against Slovakia the movement of his attack stretched the opposition defence.

Germany started in a 4-2-3-1 formation with Draxler on the left, Ozil in middle and Thomas Muller on the right of the attack, just behind striker Gomez.

But Draxler often interchanged with Ozil, and Muller spread himself about the Slovak half.

Jan Kozak’s side spent the match chasing the Germans, and the game, after Bayern Munich’s Boateng rifled in the first with a brilliant piece of opportunism.

They should have made it 2-0 but Ozil’s tame spot-kick was easily saved by Matus Kozacik, after Gomez had been fouled by Martin Skrtel.

That miss did not knock the Germans off their stride, however, as the excellent Draxler teased Kucka down the left before finding Gomez, who scored his second of the tournament.

And despite playing at a lower tempo after the break, Germany still managed to score a third when Draxler placed a near-post volley high past Kozacik.

Another German gem

Julian Draxler had one of his best games in a Germany shirt

Although Draxler is only 22, he has been deemed as one of the best attacking midfielders in Europe since his 2011-12 breakthrough season at Schalke.

In an interview with the BBC in 2013, he spoke about improving his game without the ball, and now in 2016 the Wolfsburg player is almost the finished product.

His runs allowed Toni Kroos and Ozil to find space and influence the attack. And his final ball has also improved, as demonstrated when he set up Gomez for the second goal. The well-taken volley in the 63rd minute was deserved reward for an impressive performance.

Having played a peripheral role at the 2014 World Cup, he is now a major part of Low’s side.

Man of the match – Toni Kroos (Germany)

Julian Draxler was the sponsors’ man of the match, but Toni Kroos deserves the BBC award for his display in central midfield. The Real Madrid player had 96 passes – the most of any Germany player and three times as many as Draxler – with 79 of those coming in the opposition half. Despite playing deeper he still managed four shots.

What they said

Draxler on his display: I am happy that I put in a good performance today and that I was able to help the team.

“It is hard for me to say if this was my best or second-best game in a Germany shirt. Others can judge that better.

“We have a very capable side. So it’s no problem if you are not playing in one game or the other. I tried not to let it get to me and to show in training that the coach could count on me.

“In the team talk the coach told me to look for one-on-ones. He has given me a lot of confidence and made it clear to me that I am a good player.”

Slovakia goalkeeper Matus Kozacik: “We feel sorry because, from the beginning, the Germans dominated. We did not make them suffer at all. It is a pity.

“Perhaps after we defeated them in the [pre-Euros friendly], they prepared better. They played in a disciplined way and showed their greatness.

“If Kucka could have scored, we might have done something but their second goal was decisive.

“We have achieved a lot, I am very happy I could be here. After some time, we will appreciate it even more.”

The stats you need to know

  • Germany have kept four clean sheets at Euro 2016 – more than they have recorded in any other edition of the European Championships.
  • Gomez is now Germany’s joint-top scorer at the European Championships, alongside Jurgen Klinsmann (five goals).
  • Draxler is the first Germany player to score and assist in a single Euros match since Philipp Lahm in 2008 (v Turkey).
  • Ozil has also missed his last three penalties in competitive action (for club and country alike).
  • Only Miroslav Klose (37) has appeared more times for Germany at major competitions than Bastian Schweinsteiger (36).

Live Text

Match ends, Germany 3, Slovakia 0.

Second Half ends, Germany 3, Slovakia 0.

Attempt missed. Toni Kroos (Germany) right footed shot from a difficult angle and long range on the left is close, but misses the top right corner from a direct free kick.

Juraj Kucka (Slovakia) is shown the yellow card for a bad foul.

Mesut Özil (Germany) wins a free kick on the left wing.

Foul by Juraj Kucka (Slovakia).

Attempt saved. Toni Kroos (Germany) right footed shot from the centre of the box is saved in the centre of the goal. Assisted by Thomas Müller.

Corner, Germany. Conceded by Kornel Salata.

Corner, Germany. Conceded by Kornel Salata.

Corner, Germany. Conceded by Patrik Hrosovsky.

Offside, Slovakia. Marek Hamsik tries a through ball, but Juraj Kucka is caught offside.

Substitution, Slovakia. Kornel Salata replaces Norbert Gyömbér.

Corner, Germany. Conceded by Peter Pekarík.

Attempt blocked. Lukas Podolski (Germany) left footed shot from a difficult angle on the left is blocked. Assisted by Mesut Özil.

Jonas Hector (Germany) wins a free kick on the left wing.

Foul by Juraj Kucka (Slovakia).

Offside, Germany. Joshua Kimmich tries a through ball, but Lukas Podolski is caught offside.

Corner, Germany. Conceded by Martin Skrtel.

Joshua Kimmich (Germany) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

Foul by Stanislav Sestak (Slovakia).

Substitution, Germany. Bastian Schweinsteiger replaces Sami Khedira.

Lukas Podolski (Germany) wins a free kick on the left wing.

Foul by Milan Skriniar (Slovakia).

Substitution, Germany. Lukas Podolski replaces Julian Draxler.

Substitution, Germany. Benedikt Höwedes replaces Jérôme Boateng.

Attempt missed. Jan Gregus (Slovakia) right footed shot from outside the box is high and wide to the right. Assisted by Marek Hamsik.

Attempt missed. Jan Durica (Slovakia) left footed shot from outside the box is close, but misses to the right. Assisted by Marek Hamsik from a direct free kick.

Mats Hummels (Germany) is shown the yellow card for a bad foul.

Foul by Mats Hummels (Germany).

Stanislav Sestak (Slovakia) wins a free kick in the attacking half.

Toni Kroos (Germany) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

Foul by Milan Skriniar (Slovakia).

Substitution, Slovakia. Stanislav Sestak replaces Michal Duris.

Goal! Germany 3, Slovakia 0. Julian Draxler (Germany) right footed shot from the left side of the six yard box to the top left corner following a corner.

Attempt blocked. Mats Hummels (Germany) header from the centre of the box is blocked. Assisted by Toni Kroos with a cross.

Corner, Germany. Conceded by Jan Durica.

Jonas Hector (Germany) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

Foul by Michal Duris (Slovakia).

Attempt missed. Juraj Kucka (Slovakia) right footed shot from outside the box is high and wide to the right. Assisted by Marek Hamsik from a direct free kick.

Foul by Julian Draxler (Germany).

Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed

 

Media playback is not supported on this device

Highlights: France 2-1 Republic of Ireland

Hosts France came from behind to beat the Republic of Ireland, who finished with 10 men, and reach the quarter-finals of Euro 2016.

The Republic got off to a stunning start, leading in the second minute, as Robbie Brady converted a penalty after Shane Long was fouled in the box.

But the French hit back through Antoine Griezmann, who nodded in the equaliser before driving in the winning goal.

Shane Duffy was then sent off for a professional foul on Griezmann.

Didier Deschamps’ side will face England or Iceland in the next round at Stade de France on Sunday, 3 July (kick-off 20:00 BST).

However, defender Adil Rami and midfielder N’Golo Kante will miss the match through suspension, after picking up their second bookings of the tournament.

Media playback is not supported on this device

Martin O’Neill proud of Irish side after Lyon defeat

Lack of firepower hurts Republic

Striker Long had said before the match that his side were not motivated by “revenge” as the sides met for the first time since Thierry Henry’s controversial handball led to the Republic’s elimination in a World Cup qualifying play-off in 2009.

This was the Irish’s first appearance in the knockout stages of the European Championship and their pocket of fans dressed in green at one corner of the stadium in Lyon responded with delight as Paul Pogba bundled over Southampton’s Long and Brady converted the spot kick via a post.

Media playback is not supported on this device

Republic stun France with early penalty

It could have been worse for the French had Daryl Murphy’s hooked shot not been tipped away by goalkeeper Hugo Lloris.

But in the end, they did not have enough firepower up front, failing to hit the target thereafter and ending the tournament with just three goals from four matches.

Under increasing pressure in the second period, Martin O’Neill’s defenders held out until the 58th minute, after which they crumbled.

Media playback is not supported on this device

Republic’s Robbie Brady rues missed opportunity

France finally coming together?

The French had to regroup after their sloppy start, but showed they are capable of being real contenders if they cut out their mistakes.

Juventus midfielder Pogba was imposing following his early error, having more touches (91) and providing more passes (66) than any player on the field. At the back, centre-halves Rami and Laurent Koscielny were untroubled, while frontman Griezmann clinically took his chances.

France peppered the Republic of Ireland with shots – nine were on target, eight were off target, six were blocked

The first was a powerful header from Bacary Sagna’s cross and the second a composed finish into the bottom corner from Olivier Giroud’s flick-on.

France should have had more goals, but Darren Randolph kept out further Griezmann efforts as well as a thumping strike from Blaise Matuidi. The Republic goalkeeper ended the match having made nine saves.

Les Bleus were booed off at half-time by their supporters, but they should know their team only come alive in the second half of matches, having now scored 11 of their past 12 European Championship goals in the second period.

The result in Paris was their first victory in the knockout stages of the Euros since their extra-time triumph over Italy in the final of Euro 2000.

Man of the match – Antoine Griezmann (France)

Atletico Madrid striker Griezmann kept his country in the tournament with two well-taken goals

What they said:

Republic of Ireland defender Seamus Coleman: “We are just so disappointed at the minute. I suppose that shows how well we have done. I just felt like it was there for us today.

“Our fans were unbelievable and we’d love to go a bit further for them, but we hope we made people proud because our fans are amazing and everyone back home is amazing.”

France forward Antoine Griezmann: “We struggled to get into the game and we still have a long way to go, so we will need to improve. But we are going to enjoy this and make the most of it.

“My family were in the stands as Lyon is basically my home town so that adds to it. I hope to be able to continue in this vein and to help the team.”

Media playback is not supported on this device

Hugo Lloris praises France’s second-half performance

The stats you need to know:

  • France came from behind to win a Euro finals game for the first time since 2004 (against England).
  • Griezmann is the first France player to score three goals in a single European Championship finals since Zinedine Zidane in 2004 (3).
  • Robbie Brady is the first player to score in consecutive European Championship finals matches for the Republic of Ireland.
  • The Republic scored with their only shot on target of the match.

Live Text

Match ends, France 2, Republic of Ireland 1.

Second Half ends, France 2, Republic of Ireland 1.

Substitution, France. Moussa Sissoko replaces Kingsley Coman because of an injury.

Foul by Blaise Matuidi (France).

Jeff Hendrick (Republic of Ireland) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

Attempt saved. Antoine Griezmann (France) left footed shot from the centre of the box is saved in the centre of the goal. Assisted by Dimitri Payet.

Attempt saved. Dimitri Payet (France) right footed shot from outside the box is saved in the centre of the goal. Assisted by Kingsley Coman.

Attempt missed. André-Pierre Gignac (France) right footed shot from the centre of the box is close, but misses to the right. Assisted by Kingsley Coman with a cross.

Attempt missed. Jonathan Walters (Republic of Ireland) right footed shot from outside the box misses to the left. Assisted by Shane Long.

Attempt missed. André-Pierre Gignac (France) right footed shot from the centre of the box is close, but misses to the right. Assisted by Blaise Matuidi with a cross.

Corner, France. Conceded by Stephen Ward.

Attempt blocked. Kingsley Coman (France) left footed shot from outside the box is blocked. Assisted by Dimitri Payet.

Attempt saved. Blaise Matuidi (France) left footed shot from a difficult angle on the left is saved in the top centre of the goal. Assisted by André-Pierre Gignac.

Hand ball by Wes Hoolahan (Republic of Ireland).

Corner, France. Conceded by Stephen Ward.

Corner, France. Conceded by Richard Keogh.

Corner, France. Conceded by John O’Shea.

André-Pierre Gignac (France) hits the bar with a right footed shot from the left side of the box. Assisted by Blaise Matuidi.

Attempt saved. André-Pierre Gignac (France) right footed shot from the right side of the box is saved in the centre of the goal. Assisted by Kingsley Coman with a through ball.

Corner, France. Conceded by Stephen Ward.

Substitution, France. André-Pierre Gignac replaces Olivier Giroud.

Shane Long (Republic of Ireland) is shown the yellow card.

Substitution, Republic of Ireland. Wes Hoolahan replaces James McCarthy.

Adil Rami (France) wins a free kick on the right wing.

Foul by Robbie Brady (Republic of Ireland).

Substitution, Republic of Ireland. John O’Shea replaces James McClean.

Attempt blocked. Antoine Griezmann (France) left footed shot from outside the box is blocked.

Shane Duffy (Republic of Ireland) is shown the red card.

Antoine Griezmann (France) wins a free kick in the attacking half.

Foul by Shane Duffy (Republic of Ireland).

Substitution, Republic of Ireland. Jonathan Walters replaces Daryl Murphy.

Goal! France 2, Republic of Ireland 1. Antoine Griezmann (France) left footed shot from the centre of the box to the bottom right corner. Assisted by Olivier Giroud with a headed pass.

Attempt missed. Dimitri Payet (France) right footed shot from outside the box is too high.

Attempt missed. Stephen Ward (Republic of Ireland) left footed shot from outside the box is high and wide to the right.

Goal! France 1, Republic of Ireland 1. Antoine Griezmann (France) header from the centre of the box to the top left corner. Assisted by Bacary Sagna with a cross.

Corner, France. Conceded by Darren Randolph.

Attempt saved. Blaise Matuidi (France) left footed shot from outside the box is saved in the bottom left corner. Assisted by Paul Pogba.

Attempt blocked. Dimitri Payet (France) right footed shot from outside the box is blocked. Assisted by Paul Pogba.

Attempt missed. Dimitri Payet (France) left footed shot from outside the box is close, but misses to the right. Assisted by Blaise Matuidi.

Foul by Olivier Giroud (France).

Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed