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Sadio Mane scored 15 goals for Southampton last season

Southampton striker Sadio Mane will have a medical at Liverpool on Monday after the clubs agreed a transfer fee of £34m, BBC Radio Solent understands.

The fee could rise to £36m, making the deal one of Liverpool’s most expensive, rivalling £32.5m for Christian Benteke and £35m for Andy Carroll.

Manager Jurgen Klopp wants to boost his attacking options and made Mane a prime transfer target this summer.

It had been thought the Saints wanted closer to £40m for the Senegalese.

The deal is expected to be confirmed on Tuesday.

Klopp was impressed by Mane when he scored twice as Southampton came from 2-0 down to beat Liverpool 3-2 at St Mary’s on 20 March.

Alongside England striker Daniel Sturridge and Belgium youngster Divock Origi, Mane, who scored 11 goals in 37 Premier League games last season, would add pace and a goalscoring threat.

Liverpool may seek to recoup most of the money they spend on the Mane by selling fellow striker Benteke, who has struggled since his move from Aston Villa in 2015.

Mane is set to tread a well-worn path between Southampton and Liverpool.

Adam Lallana, Dejan Lovren, Rickie Lambert and Nathaniel Clyne have all moved to Anfield since the summer of 2014.

It would also give Saints a handsome profit on a player they bought from Salzburg for £10m two years ago.

They have already sold midfielder Victor Wanyama to Tottenham for £11m.

Southampton are still without a manager following the departure of Ronald Koeman to Everton but have been linked with former Nice boss Claude Puel.

Liverpool also want to sign Leicester City’s 19-year-old left-back Ben Chilwell, who did not play in the Foxes’ title-winning campaign.

This move is currently on hold because Liverpool are unwilling to meet Leicester’s £10m asking price for the youngster who had a spell on loan at Huddersfield Town last season.

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Highlights, goals and fun from Sunday at the European Championship in France.

Catch up with all the goals, match highlights, fun moments and more from Saturday at the 2016 Uefa European Championship in France.

Watch more Euro 2016 videos here.

Available to UK users only.

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Euro 2016: Roy Hodgson expecting ‘very difficult game’ for England against Iceland

England manager Roy Hodgson looks certain to recall Raheem Sterling for what he accepts is a “win or bust” match against Iceland in the last 16 at Euro 2016 in Nice on Monday.

The 21-year-old Manchester City winger, who has struggled so far in the tournament, is expected to replace Adam Lallana as Harry Kane and Daniel Sturridge form England’s attacking spearhead.

Sterling was substituted at half-time in the 2-1 win against Wales when England trailed 1-0 and was left out of the goalless draw with Slovakia.

However, Sterling received strong public backing from England assistant boss Ray Lewington and former Liverpool team-mate Sturridge, who told BBC Radio 5 Live that Sterling was “one of the most talented players in the world”.

He is likely to start on the left with Kane through the centre, leaving Sturridge to try and pose a threat from a position on the right.

England’s likely line-up: Hart, Walker, Cahill, Smalling, Rose, Alli, Dier, Rooney, Sterling, Kane, Sturridge.

Hodgson’s deal expires at the end of the tournament and Football Association chairman Greg Dyke has said the 68-year-old will only stay on if England “do well”, suggesting that a quarter-final place was a minimum requirement.

Hosts France, who beat the Republic of Ireland 2-1, will be the quarter-final opponents in Paris next Sunday should England beat underdogs Iceland, who are ranked 34th in the world.

Hodgson is aware of how the knockout phase could impact on his own future, saying: “I think the day you stop concerning yourself, worrying about it, thinking about it, that’s the day when you’ve lost interest in the work.”

The wrong half of the draw?

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Euro 2016: Dangerous Iceland have nothing to lose – Gary Cahill

England could only finish second behind Wales in Group B, therefore dropping into the harder half of the Euro 2016 draw alongside France, Germany, Spain and Italy.

Hodgson was criticised after he made six changes to his side and then missed out on the win against Slovakia that would have put them at the head of their section, instead drawing 0-0.

The manager added: “All you can do is force yourself to worry only about the things you can do – to make certain that when you look in the mirror, as the players go out on to the field, you can look at yourself and say ‘What else could I have done?’

“‘Did we prepare well enough? Was the training right? Have I chosen the right team?'”

England’s draw against Slovakia meant a last-16 meeting with Iceland, but placed them in what is widely regarded as the tougher half of the draw if they move deeper into Euro 2016.

Their fans were starting to gather in the south of France on Sunday – and Hodgson knows there is only one outcome that will satisfy the thousands expected to gather inside the Allianz Riviera Stade De Nice, England’s players and, in all likelihood, the FA.

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England will excite people – Sturridge

Hodgson demands ruthless streak

England scored only three goals in three group games and Hodgson revealed the squad had been “brutal” on themselves in an attempt to cure a lack of cutting edge.

“I don’t think we can be accused of not having imposed ourselves on the game,” he said. “I don’t even think we can be accused of not creating any goal chances because I think we have.

“We haven’t taken them and as a result we have drawn against Slovakia in a game in which, with that type of domination, should have been a win but we didn’t get it.

“We need to be as ruthless as we can possibly be because we know there are no prizes, unfortunately, for playing what some people might think is good football.

“It’s now all about winning or losing, staying in or going out, and we have been very brutal with ourselves in that respect and we have a very brutal focus.”

A life-changing match for Iceland players

Iceland trained at the Allianz Riviera stadium on Sunday

Joint Iceland coach Heimir Hallgrimsson, 49, had to take time off work for this tournament as he juggles his role with the national team with his job as a part-time dentist.

He will take over from his co-manager Lars Lagerback at the end of this tournament, and he believes he and his players could be in for a life-changing experience if they beat England.

“The players have already won the hearts of all Icelandic people for their performances,” he said.

“If we beat England, their lives will significantly change forever. Icelandic football will go up in reputation and the way we approach football will be different.

“It will all look different for us. If you want the best out of life, you have to be ready when the chance is there for you.

“There aren’t bigger chances than this for Icelandic football. It’s just up to the players to play and hopefully we will beat England. But whichever way this goes, these players are winners already.”

What can England expect from Iceland?

BBC Sport’s Paul Fletcher in Paris

Roy Hodgson should know what to expect when his team play Iceland – after all they have been unchanged for all three of their games in France.

They have averaged 29% possession so far, attempted the lowest number of dribbles in the group stage, made the second-lowest number of successful passes and had the joint second-lowest numbers of shots.

It all hints at Hodgson’s side facing another test against a defensively-orientated side. England’s ability to carve open an opponent faces a significant examination; their supposedly suspect defence will perhaps be under less pressure.

That said, captain Aron Gunnarsson will look to launch balls into the England box with long throws whenever possible – meaning that some test of England’s defending in aerial battles can be expected.

Iceland play a rigid 4-4-2. They are physical and well-organised and have enough craft to slow the game down.

Big, robust and incredibly determined – striker Jon Dadi Bodvarsson tweeted that he was “ready to run until my lungs give out” before their game against Austria and duly scored his first goal in 20 appearances. It is this type of spirit that epitomises his team and which England must overcome in Nice.

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Euro 2016: Icelandic commentator goes wild over late winner

A dentist and a Eurovision video director

  • Iceland is the smallest nation to take part at a European Championship or World Cup. With a population of 330,000, it has as many people as Leicester.
  • With no professional clubs in Iceland, all 23 players ply their trade abroad. Former Chelsea and Barcelona forward Eidur Gudjohnsen, now aged 37, is the most notable name, along with British-based players Gylfi Sigurdsson (Swansea), Aron Gunnarsson (Cardiff) and Johann Gudmundsson (Charlton).
  • Penalties. A word which strikes fear into all England fans. But they will be hoping Iceland’s inexperience in these nerve-jangling situations is a positive. Iceland have never taken part in a penalty shootout.
  • Iceland do have one veteran of a European tournament. Sort of. That’s because goalkeeper Hannes Halldorsson directed the video for the country’s 2012 Eurovision entry. Incidentally, neither Iceland or Great Britain gave each other any points in that contest – a 0-0 stalemate if you like.

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Lionel Messi made his debut for Argentina in 2005

Argentina and Barcelona forward Lionel Messi retired from international duty after missing in a penalty shootout as Chile won the Copa America final.

“For me the national team is over. I’ve done all I can, it hurts not to be a champion,” the 29-year-old said.

With Barcelona, Messi has won eight La Liga titles and four Champions Leagues.

But his only major international honour is 2008 Olympic gold, with Argentina now having lost three major finals in three years.

Argentina were beaten 1-0 in the 2014 World Cup final by Germany before two Copa America final defeats by Chile on penalties. He was also on the losing side against Brazil in the 2007 Copa America final.

After Sunday’s match finished 0-0 in 120 minutes, Chile won 4-2 on penalties.

Messi’s penalty miss was Argentina’s first attempt in the shootout and it ballooned over the bar after Sergio Romero had denied Chile’s Arturo Vidal.

Lucas Biglia also missed from 12 yards, with Chilean substitute Francisco Silva scoring the decisive spot-kick in the final in East Rutherford, New Jersey.

More to follow.

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Euro 2016: Hungary 0-4 Belgium highlights

Eden Hazard scored a dazzling solo goal as Belgium defeated Hungary to book a Euro 2016 last-eight tie against Wales.

The Chelsea winger was outstanding in Toulouse and capped off a good Belgium display when he cut in from the left, beat two players and fired in low.

Tottenham’s Toby Alderweireld headed Belgium ahead and Michu Batshuayi made it 2-0 when he tapped in.

Hazard then scored his superb goal in the 80th minute before Yannick Carrasco fired in the fourth in stoppage time.

Belgium and Wales will meet in Lille on Friday.

Relive the action as it happened in Toulouse

Report: France 2-1 Republic of Ireland

Report: Germany 3-0 Slovakia

The ‘golden generation’ make it count

Kevin De Bruyne had 78 touches of the ball – more than any other player – and also had the most efforts on goal

They underwhelmed at the 2014 World Cup, but the most promising Belgium squad since Guy Thys’ 1980 runners-up suggested they could be set to fulfil their potential on the big stage.

At times, they made hard work of it against the Magyars, but they did create 25 efforts on goal.

Manchester City’s Kevin De Bruyne had seven of those, including a brilliant first-half free-kick that was tipped over by 40-year-old Gabor Kiraly. The 24-year-old also provided two of the four assists.

Both he and Hazard were the most potent weapons, with Everton striker Romelu Lukaku failing to marry willingness with goal threat.

It was Spurs defender Alderweireld who gave the Belgians a 10th-minute lead when he headed in De Bruyne’s free-kick from the left.

After soaking up Hungarian pressure, they finally scored a second when Batshuayi slotted in Hazard’s square ball, only two minutes after coming on.

Hazard made it 3-0 with the goal of the game. Belgium broke from the Hungary area, De Bruyne played a pass to the feet of Hazard who dived in from the left, eased past two challenges before slotting into the keeper’s bottom left.

By this point, Hungary had given up the fight and were handed a knockout blow when Atletico Madrid’s Carrasco, on as a substitute, slammed in from a Radja Nainggolan through ball.

Warning: Hazard in form

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Euro 2016: Eden Hazard scores Belgium’s third goal against Hungary

The 2014-15 Premier League footballer of the year was a disappointment last season.

He only managed six goals in 50 appearances for a Chelsea side who went from champions to finishing 10th.

However, towards the end of that campaign he began to show glimpses of the form of the previous season and against Hungary he gave right-back Adam Lang a full workout.

Aside from his goal and assist, he made the joint second-highest number of passes (48) and had three efforts on goal.

Belgium coach Marc Wilmots said: “I told Eden that I wanted to score a goal by cutting inside.

“He wasn’t close enough to the goal and he needs to have fun when he’s out on the pitch. A captain can’t always do his talking with his mouth. Sometimes you have to do your talking with your feet and that’s what he did today.”

BBC analyst Trevor Sinclair added: “It was an absolutely outstanding, world-class performance. He’s the man of the match – that was the performance of the tournament. He has led by example.”

Unlucky Hungary

Coach Bernd Stock’s side can be proud of their efforts in what was Hungary’s first major tournament since the 1986 World Cup finals.

They were a clear second best to Belgium in the first half, but improved markedly after the break and went close through Adam Szalai’s header and centre-back Roland Juhasz’s beautiful angled strike with the outside of his boot.

Had they converted one of those chances, then the outcome might have been very different.

Man of the match – Kevin De Bruyne (Belgium)

Eden Hazard was brilliant but Kevin De Bruyne led the attack from kick off and provided two assists

‘I have to congratulate Belgium’

Belgium coach Marc Wilmots: “We should have been at least 3-0 up at half-time. We kept the game at 1-0 too long.

“We scored the second and third goals very quickly, but we needed a lot of chances. In big games you don’t get as many chances, you get punished.

“I told my players to be patient. Often in training, we do two-touch passing. In Brazil you asked me why and today you see why. You can move the ball very quickly.

“I have to say Kevin De Bruyne, every time he lost the ball he made the effort to come back and that’s what makes the side strong. When we don’t have the ball we don’t allow many chances.”

Hungary boss Bernd Storck: “We knew we were coming up against terrific opposition.

“I have to congratulate the team for their performance throughout the championships. We have a positive view of the future.”

Live Text

Match ends, Hungary 0, Belgium 4.

Second Half ends, Hungary 0, Belgium 4.

Ádám Szalai (Hungary) is shown the yellow card.

Marouane Fellaini (Belgium) is shown the yellow card for a bad foul.

Ádám Szalai (Hungary) wins a free kick in the attacking half.

Foul by Marouane Fellaini (Belgium).

Goal! Hungary 0, Belgium 4. Yannick Carrasco (Belgium) left footed shot from the left side of the box to the bottom left corner. Assisted by Radja Nainggolan with a through ball following a fast break.

Attempt saved. Ákos Elek (Hungary) left footed shot from the centre of the box is saved in the centre of the goal. Assisted by Ádám Szalai.

Michy Batshuayi (Belgium) is shown the yellow card.

Balázs Dzsudzsák (Hungary) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

Foul by Michy Batshuayi (Belgium).

Delay over. They are ready to continue.

Delay in match Axel Witsel (Belgium) because of an injury.

Attempt blocked. Balázs Dzsudzsák (Hungary) left footed shot from outside the box is blocked.

Nemanja Nikolic (Hungary) wins a free kick in the attacking half.

Foul by Thomas Vermaelen (Belgium).

Attempt saved. Michy Batshuayi (Belgium) right footed shot from outside the box is saved in the centre of the goal. Assisted by Axel Witsel.

Ádám Nagy (Hungary) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

Foul by Radja Nainggolan (Belgium).

Attempt saved. Gergö Lovrencsics (Hungary) left footed shot from outside the box is saved in the centre of the goal.

Corner, Hungary. Conceded by Marouane Fellaini.

Attempt saved. Ádám Szalai (Hungary) right footed shot from the centre of the box is saved in the top centre of the goal. Assisted by Richárd Guzmics.

Corner, Hungary. Conceded by Toby Alderweireld.

Attempt blocked. Ákos Elek (Hungary) left footed shot from the left side of the box is blocked. Assisted by Gergö Lovrencsics.

Balázs Dzsudzsák (Hungary) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

Foul by Kevin De Bruyne (Belgium).

Substitution, Belgium. Marouane Fellaini replaces Eden Hazard.

Substitution, Hungary. Dániel Böde replaces Roland Juhász.

Goal! Hungary 0, Belgium 3. Eden Hazard (Belgium) right footed shot from outside the box to the bottom right corner. Assisted by Kevin De Bruyne following a fast break.

Goal! Hungary 0, Belgium 2. Michy Batshuayi (Belgium) right footed shot from very close range to the bottom right corner. Assisted by Eden Hazard following a corner.

Corner, Belgium. Conceded by Tamás Kádár.

Substitution, Belgium. Michy Batshuayi replaces Romelu Lukaku.

Substitution, Hungary. Nemanja Nikolic replaces Ádám Pintér.

Foul by Tamás Kádár (Hungary).

Romelu Lukaku (Belgium) wins a free kick on the right wing.

Substitution, Belgium. Yannick Carrasco replaces Dries Mertens.

Foul by Ákos Elek (Hungary).

Radja Nainggolan (Belgium) wins a free kick in the defensive half.

Ádám Szalai (Hungary) wins a free kick in the attacking half.

Foul by Thomas Vermaelen (Belgium).

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Hodgson expects ‘very difficult game’ against Iceland

England v Iceland (Monday, 20:00 BST)

How to follow:
Watch on ITV, listen on BBC Radio 5 live, text commentary on the BBC Sport website.

England manager Roy Hodgson accepts he faces a “win or bust” match when they meet Iceland in the last 16 at Euro 2016 in Nice on Monday.

Hodgson’s deal expires at the end of the tournament and Football Association chairman Greg Dyke has said the 68-year-old will only stay on if England “do well”, suggesting that a quarter-final place was a minimum requirement.

Hosts France, who beat the Republic of Ireland 2-1, will be the quarter-final opponents in Paris next Sunday should England beat underdogs Iceland, who are ranked 34th in the world.

Hodgson is aware of how the knockout phase could impact on his own future, saying: “I think the day you stop concerning yourself, worrying about it, thinking about it, that’s the day when you’ve lost interest in the work.”

England’s likely line-up: Hart, Walker, Cahill, Smalling, Rose, Alli, Dier, Rooney, Sterling/Lallana, Kane, Sturridge.

The wrong half of the draw?

England could only finish second behind Wales in Group B, therefore dropping into the harder half of the Euro 2016 draw alongside France, Germany, Spain and Italy.

Hodgson was criticised after he made six changes to his side and then missed out on the win against Slovakia that would have put them at the head of their section, instead drawing 0-0.

The manager added: “All you can do is force yourself to worry only about the things you can do – to make certain that when you look in the mirror, as the players go out on to the field, you can look at yourself and say ‘What else could I have done?’

“Did we prepare well enough? Was the training right? Have I chosen the right team?'”

England’s draw against Slovakia meant a last-16 meeting with Iceland, but placed them in what is widely regarded as the tougher half of the draw if they move deeper into Euro 2016.

Their fans were starting to gather in the south of France on Sunday – and Hodgson knows there is only one outcome that will satisfy the thousands expected to gather inside the Allianz Riviera Stade De Nice, England’s players and, in all likelihood, the FA.

Media playback is not supported on this device

England will excite people – Sturridge

Hodgson demands ruthless streak

England scored only three goals in three group games and Hodgson revealed the squad had been “brutal” on themselves in an attempt to cure a lack of cutting edge.

“I don’t think we can be accused of not having imposed ourselves on the game,” he said. “I don’t even think we can be accused of not creating any goal chances because I think we have.

“We haven’t taken them and as a result we have drawn against Slovakia in a game in which, with that type of domination, should have been a win but we didn’t get it.

“We need to be as ruthless as we can possibly be because we know there are no prizes, unfortunately, for playing what some people might think is good football.

“It’s now all about winning or losing, staying in or going out, and we have been very brutal with ourselves in that respect and we have a very brutal focus.”

A life-changing match for Iceland players

Iceland trained at the Allianz Riviera stadium on Sunday

Joint Iceland coach Heimir Hallgrimsson, 49, had to take time off work for this tournament as he juggles his role with the national team with his job as a part-time dentist.

He will take over from his co-manager Lars Lagerback at the end of this tournament, and he believes he and his players could be in for a life-changing experience if they beat England.

“The players have already won the hearts of all Icelandic people for their performances,” he said.

“If we beat England, their lives will significantly change forever. Icelandic football will go up in reputation and the way we approach football will be different.

“It will all look different for us. If you want the best out of life, you have to be ready when the chance is there for you.

“There aren’t bigger chances than this for Icelandic football. It’s just up to the players to play and hopefully we will beat England. But whichever way this goes, these players are winners already.”

What can England expect from Iceland?

BBC Sport’s Paul Fletcher in Paris

Roy Hodgson should know what to expect when his team play Iceland – after all they have been unchanged for all three of their games in France.

They have averaged 29% possession so far, attempted the lowest number of dribbles in the group stage, made the second-lowest number of successful passes and had the joint second-lowest numbers of shots.

It all hints at Hodgson’s side facing another test against a defensively-orientated side. England’s ability to carve open an opponent faces a significant examination; their supposedly suspect defence will perhaps be under less pressure.

That said, captain Aron Gunnarsson will look to launch balls into the England box with long throws whenever possible – meaning that some test of England’s defending in aerial battles can be expected.

Iceland play a rigid 4-4-2. They are physical and well-organised and have enough craft to slow the game down.

Big, robust and incredibly determined – striker Jon Dadi Bodvarsson tweeted that he was “ready to run until my lungs give out” before their game against Austria and duly scored his first goal in 20 appearances. It is this type of spirit that epitomises his team and which England must overcome in Nice.

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Euro 2016: Icelandic commentator goes wild over late winner

A dentist and a Eurovision video director

  • Iceland is the smallest nation to take part at a European Championship or World Cup. With a population of 330,000, it has as many people as Leicester.
  • With no professional clubs in Iceland, all 23 players ply their trade abroad. Former Chelsea and Barcelona forward Eidur Gudjohnsen, now aged 37, is the most notable name, along with British-based players Gylfi Sigurdsson (Swansea), Aron Gunnarsson (Cardiff) and Johann Gudmundsson (Charlton).
  • Penalties. A word which strikes fear into all England fans. But they will be hoping Iceland’s inexperience in these nerve-jangling situations is a positive. Iceland have never taken part in a penalty shootout.
  • Iceland do have one veteran of a European tournament. Sort of. That’s because goalkeeper Hannes Halldorsson directed the video for the country’s 2012 Eurovision entry. Incidentally, neither Iceland or Great Britain gave each other any points in that contest – a 0-0 stalemate if you like.

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